Alzheimer’s Clinical Trials Cooperstown

Alzheimer's Clinical Trials Cooperstown

Doctor Richard F. Holub Alzheimer's disease is the deterioration of brain cells over time, which causes problems with thinking, behavior, and most notably memory. Forgetfulness is often considered to be a normal aspect of aging, but Alzheimer's symptoms are typically much more apparent and  become worse and happen more frequently over time.

Research is constantly being conducted in order to develop new treatments for patients effected by Alzheimer's disease. There is a pressing need for patients who want to be a part of clinical research studies for the development of these treatments. If you or a loved one want to enter an Alzheimer's Clinical Research trial please contact the office to schedule an initial screening appointment.

Alzheimer's Research Cooperstown

page2_pic1Researchers have developed treatment strategies that show potential in more effectively treating Alzheimer's disease. Nearly all of these new therapies designed to slow or stop Alzheimer's are currently in clinical testing with human volunteers.

Many studies have shown with consistent results that actively managing Alzheimer's and other dementia can make a significant improvement in quality of life through every stage of the disease for both the patient and their caregiver. Active management means appropriately using all available treatment options, as well as considering all existing conditions, coordinating care among doctors and caregivers, and counseling, support groups, and regular activities. If you or a loved one want to enter an Alzheimer's Clinical Research trial please contact the office to schedule an initial screening appointment.

Alzheimer's Treatment Cooperstown

Alzheimer’s Treatment Research also suggests that brain health is directly related to the overall health of the heart and blood vessels. New research indicates that proactively managing cardiovascular risks such as high cholesterol, blood pressure, diabetes, smoking, inactivity, and obesity may help delay and even avoid cognitive decline. Most of these risk factors are controllable without drugs and can be modified in order to decrease the likelihood of both cardiovascular disease and the decreases in cognitive function that are often associated with it. In some tests a low fat diet with a lot of fruits and vegetables may even support brain health. Cognitive activity including socialization, puzzles, and other mental stimulation may also help to prevent or lower the risk for Alzheimer's and other forms of memory disorders. If you or a loved one want to enter an Alzheimer's Clinical Research trial please contact the office to schedule an initial screening appointment.